To be or not to be: A corpus-based study of unaccusative verbs and auxiliary selection

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dc.contributor.advisor Pustejovsky, James
dc.contributor.author Brutti, Richard
dc.date.accessioned 2012-06-07T14:16:28Z
dc.date.available 2012-06-07T14:16:28Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10192/54
dc.description.abstract Since the introduction of the Unaccusative Hypothesis (Perlmutter, 1978), there have been many further attempts to explain the mechanisms behind the division in intransitive verbs. This paper aims to analyze and test some of theories of unaccusativity using computational linguistic tools. Speci cally, I focus on verbs that exhibit split intransitivity, that is, verbs that can appear in both unaccusative and unergative constructions, and in determining the distinguishing features that make this alternation possible. Many formal linguistic theories of unaccusativity involve the interplay of semantic roles and temporal event markers, both of which can be analyzed using statistical computational linguistic tools, including semantic role labelers, semantic parses, and automatic event classi cation. I use auxiliary verb selection as a surface-level indicator of unaccusativity in Italian and Dutch, and iii test various classes of verbs extracted from the Europarl corpus (Koehn, 2005). Additionally, I provide some historical background for the evolution of this distinction, and analyze how my results t into the larger theoretical framework.
dc.description.sponsorship Brandeis University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Brandeis University
dc.relation.ispartofseries Brandeis University Theses and Dissertations
dc.rights Copyright by Richard A. Brutti Jr. 2012
dc.subject linguistics
dc.subject computational linguistics
dc.subject unaccusative
dc.title To be or not to be: A corpus-based study of unaccusative verbs and auxiliary selection
dc.type Thesis
dc.contributor.department Department of Computer Science
dc.degree.name MA
dc.degree.level Masters
dc.degree.discipline Computer Science
dc.degree.grantor Brandeis University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
dc.description.esploro yes


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