UN TRIOMPHE D'AVOCAT. Viens contre mon cœur, tu es acquitté!..... entre nous, tu méritais bien d'aller aux galères car tu es un fier gueux..... mais n'importe il est toujours bien doux de sauver ses semblables!..... (Le voleur, fort ému chippe la bourse de son défenseur, histoire d'emporter un souvenir d'estime et d'amitié).

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dc.contributor Donated by: Benjamin A. and Julia M. Trustman, 1959.
dc.creator Daumier, Honoré, 1808-1879
dc.date.accessioned 2007-06-08T15:48:32Z
dc.date.available 2007-06-08T15:48:32Z
dc.date.issued 1845
dc.identifier LD1129
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10192/1466
dc.description 2nd state.
dc.description Published in: Le Charivari, February 23, 1845.
dc.description.abstract Daumier must have been quite familiar with the old judicial system in France. Normally three judges were required in a hearing, accompanied by the D.A. "Procureur Impérial". The jury was usually seated along a side wall while the prisoner's bench was placed opposite to the judges. In important cases, the prisoner was flanked by two policemen. The defending advocate usually was seated in front of the prisoner, facing the judges. The hearings were open to the public and represented a welcome entertainment to Parisians, free of charge. The judges, as well as the Procureur Impérial were appointed by the Ministry of Justice and were not always free from political influence and conviction. The prosecutor held the rank of a magistrate, but wore slightly different robes than the judges. The important oratorical "activity" took place between the prosecutor, the defendant's advocate and to a certain extent the presiding judge. The jury, although important in delivering their final decision of a case, was hardly ever shown by Daumier. The verbal maneuvering took place between the two main opponents, while the judges remained impartial. This may be the reason why Daumier often showed them as sleeping or yawning, while the prosecutor or the advocate where delivering passionate oratories.
dc.format.extent 1 lithograph
dc.format.extent b&w
dc.format.extent 37 x 25.5 cm
dc.publisher Paris, 1845
dc.relation.ispartof Les Beaux jours de la vie; 42
dc.relation.isreferencedby Delteil. Daumier, 1129
dc.rights Copyright restrictions may apply. For permission to copy or use this image, contact the Robert D. Farber University Archives and Special Collections Department, Brandeis University Libraries.
dc.subject Lawyers
dc.subject Thieves
dc.subject.lcsh France -- History -- Louis-Philip, 1830-1848
dc.subject.lcsh Pickpockets
dc.title UN TRIOMPHE D'AVOCAT. Viens contre mon cœur, tu es acquitté!..... entre nous, tu méritais bien d'aller aux galères car tu es un fier gueux..... mais n'importe il est toujours bien doux de sauver ses semblables!..... (Le voleur, fort ému chippe la bourse de son défenseur, histoire d'emporter un souvenir d'estime et d'amitié).
dc.title.alternative A LAWYER'S TRIUMPH. Embrace me, you've been acquitted!..... between you and me, you ought to have been sent to the galleys, because you are a conceited beggar..... but never mind, it's always nice to be able to save one's own kind!..... (Deeply moved, the thief picks his lawyer's pocket, so that he may have something to remind him of his respect and friendship).
dc.title.alternative Charivari
dc.type still image
dc.rights.license The following credit line must be included with each item used: Benjamin A. and Julia M. Trustman Collection of Honoré Daumier Lithographs, Robert D. Farber University Archives & Special Collections Department, Brandeis University.


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