More American Than Ever: Constructing Identity & Discovering the Authentic Self in the Narratives of Black American Female Digital Nomads

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dc.contributor.advisor Lucken, Kristen
dc.contributor.author Jill, Martin
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-24T18:08:38Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-24T18:08:38Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10192/36773
dc.description.abstract In an increasingly interconnected, borderless and technologically-advanced globalized world, new forms of work life are emerging through the use of technology. Digital nomads represent one such emergent group: professionals who utilize technology to circumvent conventional work environments by working remotely. These migratory workers generate new and innovative ways to maintain their work-life in a global context. Although digital native scholarship has largely focused on the white American male, a significant number of Black American females are found within the digital nomad ranks. These middle-class, college educated, Black women are intent on circumventing traditional American work environments and perceived racial and gendered hostility in favor of independence, travel, and a work-life lived abroad. Through an ethnographic lens, this research project investigates the writings and blog posts of Black female digital natives in order to reveal how Black women negotiate concepts of nation, community, and belonging at home and abroad. Black women’s narratives also reveal how globalization, modernity and technology work together to reconstruct notions of identity and authenticity for themselves as well as their communities. This thesis argues that Black women’s voices, which are often overlooked, are a critical addition to the literature within the fields of travel, work, and leisure. By illuminating the experiences of Black women, and more specifically, Black female digital nomads, this project aspires to provide new insights into the ways in which identity, race, gender, diaspora, citizenship, and class are constructed and reconstructed in new and divergent transnational contexts.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Brandeis University
dc.relation.ispartofseries Brandeis University Theses and Dissertations
dc.rights Copyright by Jill Martin 2019.
dc.subject digital nomad
dc.subject Black women
dc.subject millennial
dc.subject American
dc.subject Black American
dc.subject Black American women
dc.subject Black millennial
dc.subject globalization
dc.subject digitization
dc.subject digital nomadism
dc.subject international
dc.subject employment
dc.subject identity
dc.subject identity construction
dc.subject identity development
dc.title More American Than Ever: Constructing Identity & Discovering the Authentic Self in the Narratives of Black American Female Digital Nomads
dc.type Thesis
dc.contributor.department Graduate Program in Global Studies
dc.degree.name MA
dc.degree.level Masters
dc.degree.discipline Global Studies
dc.degree.grantor Brandeis University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences


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