The Challenge of Professional Development in Jewish Studies: Why the Conventional Wisdom May Not Be Enough

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dc.contributor.author Hassenfeld, Ziva R.
dc.contributor.author Levisohn, Jon A.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-24T15:48:09Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-24T15:48:09Z
dc.date.issued 2019-02-12
dc.identifier.citation The Challenge of Professional Development in Jewish Studies: Why the Conventional Wisdom May Not Be Enough
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10192/36732
dc.description.abstract This article examines the ways that Jewish studies teachers think about their teaching. It analyzes data from a three month teacher study group in which teachers read educational research articles as a framework for reflecting on their own teaching. The data suggest that Jewish studies teachers take one of two approaches in talking about their teaching: Half the teachers focused on the process of teaching, the specific mod- alities and teaching moves they employed, while the other half focused on the goals of teaching, the specific outcomes they wanted to see in their students. We also found that those teachers who were more focused on outcomes (rather than process) saw personal identity as an essential ingredient in effective Jewish education. This article raises questions about the efficacy of transferring professional development models from general education to Jewish education, without special attention to the specific cultural context of Jewish studies.
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher Taylor and Francis
dc.subject Jewish day schools
dc.subject pedagogy of Jewish studies
dc.subject professional development
dc.subject teacher preparation
dc.title The Challenge of Professional Development in Jewish Studies: Why the Conventional Wisdom May Not Be Enough
dc.type Article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/15244113.2018.1558386


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