Skin and bones: the contribution of skin tone and facial structure to racial prototypicality ratings.

DSpace Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Strom, Michael A
dc.contributor.author Zebrowitz, Leslie A
dc.contributor.author Zhang, Shunan
dc.contributor.author Bronstad, P Matthew
dc.contributor.author Lee, Hoon Koo
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-05T18:27:11Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-05T18:27:11Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.other PMC3399873
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10192/36510
dc.description.abstract Previous research reveals that a more 'African' appearance has significant social consequences, yielding more negative first impressions and harsher criminal sentencing of Black or White individuals. This study is the first to systematically assess the relative contribution of skin tone and facial metrics to White, Black, and Korean perceivers' ratings of the racial prototypicality of faces from the same three groups. Our results revealed that the relative contribution of metrics and skin tone depended on both perceiver race and face race. White perceivers' racial prototypicality ratings were less responsive to variations in skin tone than were Black or Korean perceivers' ratings. White perceivers ratings' also were more responsive to facial metrics than to skin tone, while the reverse was true for Black perceivers. Additionally, across all perceiver groups, skin tone had a more consistent impact than metrics on racial prototypicality ratings of White faces, with the reverse for Korean faces. For Black faces, the relative impact varied with perceiver race: skin tone had a more consistent impact than metrics for Black and Korean perceivers, with the reverse for White perceivers. These results have significant implications for predicting who will experience racial prototypicality biases and from whom.
dc.format.extent 1 file
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.isversionof https://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0041193
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Psychology
dc.subject Social and Behavioral Sciences
dc.subject Science
dc.subject Biology
dc.subject Mental Health
dc.subject Anatomy and Physiology
dc.subject Social Prejudice
dc.subject Social Discrimination
dc.subject Medicine
dc.subject Q
dc.subject R
dc.subject Sociology
dc.subject Racial Discrimination
dc.subject Skin
dc.subject Social Psychology
dc.subject Sensory Perception
dc.subject Research Article
dc.subject Culture
dc.subject Face
dc.subject Bone and Bones
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Regression Analysis
dc.subject Perception
dc.subject Pattern Recognition
dc.subject Visual
dc.subject Social Perception
dc.subject Adolescent
dc.title Skin and bones: the contribution of skin tone and facial structure to racial prototypicality ratings.
dc.type Article
dc.contributor.department Department of Psychology
dc.relation.journal PloS One
dc.identifier.pmid 22815966


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Search BIR


Browse

My Account