Azole drugs are imported by facilitated diffusion in Candida albicans and other pathogenic fungi.

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dc.contributor.author Mansfield, Bryce E
dc.contributor.author Oltean, Hanna N
dc.contributor.author Oliver, Brian G
dc.contributor.author Hoot, Samantha J
dc.contributor.author Leyde, Sarah E
dc.contributor.author Hedstrom, Lizbeth
dc.contributor.author White, Theodore C
dc.date.accessioned 2019-01-29T18:18:32Z
dc.date.available 2019-01-29T18:18:32Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.issn 1553-7366
dc.identifier.issn 1553-7374
dc.identifier.other PMC2947996
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10192/36412
dc.description.abstract Despite the wealth of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of action and the mechanisms of resistance to azole antifungals, very little is known about how the azoles are imported into pathogenic fungal cells. Here the in-vitro accumulation and import of Fluconazole (FLC) was examined in the pathogenic fungus, Candida albicans. In energized cells, FLC accumulation correlates inversely with expression of ATP-dependent efflux pumps. In de-energized cells, all strains accumulate FLC, suggesting that FLC import is not ATP-dependent. The kinetics of import in de-energized cells displays saturation kinetics with a K(m) of 0.64 _M and V(max) of 0.0056 pmol/min/10ä cells, demonstrating that FLC import proceeds via facilitated diffusion through a transporter rather than passive diffusion. Other azoles inhibit FLC import on a mole/mole basis, suggesting that all azoles utilize the same facilitated diffusion mechanism. An analysis of related compounds indicates that competition for azole import depends on an aromatic ring and an imidazole or triazole ring together in one molecule. Import of FLC by facilitated diffusion is observed in other fungi, including Cryptococcus neoformans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida krusei, indicating that the mechanism of transport is conserved among fungal species. FLC import was shown to vary among Candida albicans resistant clinical isolates, suggesting that altered facilitated diffusion may be a previously uncharacterized mechanism of resistance to azole drugs.
dc.format.extent 1 file
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Public Library of Science
dc.relation.isversionof https://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1001126
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Antifungal Agents
dc.subject Candida albicans
dc.subject Candidiasis
dc.subject Cryptococcosis
dc.subject Cryptococcus neoformans
dc.subject Diffusion
dc.subject Drug Resistance, Fungal
dc.subject Fluconazole
dc.subject Gene Deletion
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Oxygen
dc.title Azole drugs are imported by facilitated diffusion in Candida albicans and other pathogenic fungi.
dc.type Article
dc.contributor.department Department of Biology
dc.contributor.department Department of Chemistry
dc.relation.journal PLoS Pathogens
dc.identifier.pmid 20941354


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