Behavior Change with Fitness Technology in Sedentary Adults: A Review of the evidence for increasing Physical Activity

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dc.contributor.author Sullivan, Alycia
dc.contributor.author Lachman, Margie
dc.date.accessioned 2018-04-05T19:01:52Z
dc.date.available 2018-04-05T19:01:52Z
dc.date.issued 2017-01-11
dc.identifier.citation Sullivan AN and Lachman ME (2017) Behavior Change with Fitness Technology in Sedentary Adults: A Review of the Evidence for Increasing Physical Activity. Front. Public Health 4:289
dc.identifier.issn 2296-2565
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10192/35552
dc.description Published version can be found on Frontier's in Public Health's site: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpubh.2016.00289/full
dc.description.abstract Physical activity is closely linked with health and well-being; however, many Americans do not engage in regular exercise. Older adults and those with low socioeconomic status are especially at risk for poor health, largely due to their sedentary lifestyles. Fitness technology, including trackers and smartphone applications (apps), has become increasingly popular for measuring and encouraging physical activity in recent years. However, many questions remain regarding the effectiveness of this technology for promoting behavior change. Behavior change techniques such as goal setting, feedback, rewards, and social factors are often included in fitness technology. However, it is not clear which components are most effective and which are actually being used by consumers. We discuss additional strategies not typically included in fitness technology devices or apps that are promising for engaging inactive, vulnerable populations. These include action planning, restructuring negative attitudes, enhancing environmental conditions, and identifying other barriers to regular physical activity. We consider which strategies are most conducive to motivating behavior change among sedentary adults. Overall, fitness technology has the potential to significantly impact public health, research, and policies. We suggest ways in which app developers and behavior change experts can collaborate to develop successful apps. Advances are still needed to help inactive individuals determine how, when, where, and with whom they can increase their physical activity
dc.description.sponsorship Funded by the Brandeis University Open Access Fund.
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Frontier in Public Health
dc.rights Copyright by the authors 2017.
dc.subject Fitness trackers
dc.subject Physical activity
dc.subject Older adults
dc.subject Behavior change
dc.subject Technology
dc.subject Exercise
dc.title Behavior Change with Fitness Technology in Sedentary Adults: A Review of the evidence for increasing Physical Activity
dc.type Article
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2016.00289


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