School-Based Induction Helps New Teachers Thrive

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dc.contributor.author Feiman-Nemser, Sharon
dc.contributor.author Troen, Vivian
dc.date.accessioned 2017-02-03T21:08:58Z
dc.date.available 2017-02-03T21:08:58Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Feiman-Nemser, S. & Troen, V. (2008). School-Based Induction Helps New Teachers Thrive. Ha'Yidion: The RAVSAK Journal, Winter 2008.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10192/33331
dc.description.abstract By necessity, Jewish day schools pay a lot of attention to teacher recruitment, but the other side of the coin, retention, gets short shrift. In fact, when it comes to teacher retention, Jewish day schools are like leaky swimming pools: we keep pouring more in at the top, while neglecting to fix the hole in the bottom. Years of research have shown that, in public schools, 30% to 50% of teachers leave the classroom after their first three years. The 2008 JESNA Educators in Jewish Schools Study confirms that Jewish schools aren’t doing much better in keeping our most valued teachers. What are we doing wrong? Or, perhaps more appropriately, what are we not doing at all?
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher RAVSAK: The Jewish Community Day School Network
dc.rights Copyright by RAVSAK 2014
dc.subject teacher induction
dc.subject teacher preparation
dc.subject Jewish day schools
dc.title School-Based Induction Helps New Teachers Thrive
dc.type Article


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