The Nature of the BDS Movement on US College Campuses: A Brief Analysis in Three Case Studies

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dc.contributor.advisor Sarna, Jonathan
dc.contributor.author Truesdell, Stefany
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-21T21:45:34Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-21T21:45:34Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10192/32048
dc.description.abstract This thesis studies the nature of the Boycott Divestment and Sanctions movement against Israel on select US college campuses. Using case studies as a method of information collection and presentation, I determined the primary BDS supporting student group on each campus. I then analyzed events held by the groups in order to evaluate how the student group garners support for and advances the ideology of the BDS movement on the college campuses. Additionally, this thesis evaluates if BDS on US college campuses is contributing to the spread of a “new” form of antisemitism in the guise of anti-Zionism. The campuses studied are University of California, Los Angeles, University of Michigan, and Columbia University. The student groups examined are the Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) and Students Allied for Freedom and Equality. Through lenses of alterity and liminality, this thesis examines the literature and activities of the aforementioned pro-BDS student groups on each campus for rhetoric, group definitions, justifications, and stances. This thesis offers an in depth examination into the language of the charters of the SJP groups as well as student reactions to events held on campus. When the language used and the details of their activities are measured against the U.S. State Department’s official definition of antisemitism, it becomes clear that there exists underpinnings, and in some cases outright examples, of antisemitism. This thesis ultimately concludes that BDS support on college campuses is indeed contributing to the evolution of a new antisemitic movement that implements a focus on the delegitimization of Israel as its primary vehicle. Additionally, this thesis theorizes that without better, and in some cases more, education of college students about the nature of what is and is not antisemitism, this troubling trend will continue to grow and gain popular support.
dc.description.sponsorship Brandeis University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Brandeis University
dc.relation.ispartofseries Brandeis University Theses and Dissertations
dc.rights Copyright by Stefany Truesdell 2016
dc.subject antisemitism
dc.subject US college campus
dc.subject BDS movement
dc.subject Students for Justice in Palestine
dc.subject UCLA
dc.subject University of Michigan
dc.subject Columbia University
dc.subject academic boycott
dc.subject anti-Semitism
dc.subject anti-Zionism
dc.subject boycott
dc.subject divest
dc.subject divestment
dc.subject Students Allied for Freedom and Equality
dc.subject sanction
dc.subject Jewish
dc.subject Judaism
dc.subject Israel
dc.subject Palestinian
dc.title The Nature of the BDS Movement on US College Campuses: A Brief Analysis in Three Case Studies
dc.type Thesis
dc.contributor.department Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies
dc.degree.name MA
dc.degree.level Masters
dc.degree.discipline Near Eastern and Judaic Studies
dc.degree.grantor Brandeis University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences


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