Theorizing the Politics of Educational Reform: The Case of New Jersey's Alternate Route to Teacher Certification

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dc.contributor.author Tamir, Eran
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-25T15:15:25Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-25T15:15:25Z
dc.date.issued 2008-11
dc.identifier.citation Tamir, E. (2008). Theorizing the politics of educational reform: The case of New Jersey's alternate route to teacher certification. American Journal of Education, 115(1). http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/590676
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10192/30773
dc.description.abstract Employing Bourdieu's notion of social field, this research conceptualizes New Jersey's alternate route to teacher certification as a contested arena, in which the interests, ideologies, and visions of different stake-holders regarding the character of public education have collided. Findings for this study are primarily based on data from the New Jersey State Archives and on other open public documents. I conclude that during the 1980s New Jersey became one of the leading states in developing educational policies that excluded teacher unions and teacher educators from the positions of power they formerly held in the field of educational policy, gradually subordinating them to the power of the state.
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher The University of Chicago Press
dc.rights Copyright by the University of Chicago 2008
dc.subject pedagogy of Jewish studies
dc.subject philosophy of Jewish Education
dc.title Theorizing the Politics of Educational Reform: The Case of New Jersey's Alternate Route to Teacher Certification
dc.type Article


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