How hard is it to be a Jew on college campuses?

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dc.contributor.author Kadushin, Charles
dc.contributor.author Tighe, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned 2009-05-21T19:10:59Z
dc.date.available 2009-05-21T19:10:59Z
dc.date.issued 2008-12
dc.identifier.citation http://www.springerlink.com/content/j56wt135q580/?p=c4b912f615ab4af393b297179a3b1ddd&pi=1 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10192/23260
dc.description.abstract Despite the academic successes of Jewish students on college campuses in the United States, challenges remain, particularly in terms of social involvement and ability to practice religion, much like the challenges that face students who are members of other ethnic and religious minorities. In this paper we examine data from 1,087 Jewish students at eight elite colleges and universities in the United States. The greater the percentage of Jewish students on campus and, individually, the more Jewish students feel connected to other students, including Jewish friends, the more at ease they feel. Those more engaged in Jewish religious practices experience greater difficulty, especially if there are no kosher dining facilities on campus. Both the “invisible hand” of social structure and the practical matters of Jewish observance affect Jewish students’ personal sense of ease. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Contemporary Jewry en
dc.rights The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com en
dc.subject Young adults en
dc.title How hard is it to be a Jew on college campuses? en


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