As it Likes You: Early Modern Desire and Vestigial Impersonal Constructions

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dc.contributor.advisor Flesch, Billy en_US
dc.contributor.author Cairns, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned 2009-05-14T20:15:20Z
dc.date.available 2009-05-14T20:15:20Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10192/23236
dc.description.abstract The word ‘like’, in its transition from an Old English to a modern English verb, experienced a profound syntactical transformation, having previously been glossed as ‘to please’. By the sixteenth century, ‘to like’ meant almost unconditionally what it means to modern English speakers. However, English Renaissance poets occasionally exploited its archaic usage to produce a rhetorical effect that calls into question notions of subject and object, and which, I argue, foregrounds the way in which language actually generates these subjects and objects rather than merely describing them. In this paper, I read ‘to like’ psychoanalytically as a verb whose history challenges early modern conceptions of selfhood, reflecting and reinforcing a burgeoning consumer capitalist ideology that posits desire as something contained within the self, and which the self can therefore autonomously control. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Brandeis University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences en_US
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en_US
dc.language English en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Brandeis University en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Brandeis University Theses and Dissertations
dc.rights Copyright by Daniel Cairns 2009 en_US
dc.title As it Likes You: Early Modern Desire and Vestigial Impersonal Constructions en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.contributor.department Department of English and American Literature en_US
dc.degree.name MA en_US
dc.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.degree.discipline English and American Literature en_US
dc.degree.grantor Brandeis University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences en_US


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