Reconceptualizing Religious Change: Ethno-Apostasy and Change in Religion Among American Jews

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dc.contributor.author Phillips, Benjamin en_US
dc.contributor.author Kelner, Shaul
dc.date.accessioned 2008-10-24T19:09:24Z
dc.date.available 2008-10-24T19:09:24Z
dc.date.issued 2006-12-19 en_US
dc.identifier 139 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10192/23008
dc.description Drawing upon data from the NJPS 2000-1, we argue that traditional approaches to t k study of religious mobility - both apostasy and switching - are increasingly problematic. Apostasy from ethno-religious communities, in particular, must be refomulated to incorporate an ethnic dimension. Analyses using this revised concept of "ethno-apostasy" led to results that at times diverge from those of previous research. The findings suggest that the premise that religious switching is a binary change from one mutually incompatible state to another must be reconceptualized to account for declining support in American society for the assumption that a person can hold only one religious afiliation at a time. en_US
dc.relation.ispartof en_US
dc.subject.other Socio-demography en_US
dc.title Reconceptualizing Religious Change: Ethno-Apostasy and Change in Religion Among American Jews en_US
dc.type Articles en_US
dc.contributor.department Maurice and Marilyn Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies en_US
dc.contributor.department Steinhardt Social Research Institute en_US


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